New Rochelle-Based Rowing Association Member Wins Bronze At World Meet

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Meghan Galloway, left, and Liliane Lindysa on the medal podium in Hamburg.
Meghan Galloway, left, and Liliane Lindysa on the medal podium in Hamburg. Photo Credit: Contributed

HARRISON, N.Y. – Hoisting the American flag with fervor, Harrison’s Liliane Lindsay won the bronze medal for her country at the 2014 World Rowing Junior Championships in Hamburg, Germany.

Lindsay, 18, and her teammate, Meghan Galloway of Ridgefield, Conn., are just the second U.S. Junior Women’s Pair to medal in the event at the world championship level. 

They finished with a time of 8:24:760, behind the pairs from Canada at 8:13:660, and Romania at 8:09:320. The American pair finished fifth in the women’s eight that competed at the 2013 World Rowing Junior Championships.

“Coming off last year’s disappointing result, this was the greatest redemption I could have asked for,” she said. “And nothing beats sharing this with a girl who was in that boat last year and understands the difference between being on the medal podium and being in the bottom three of the A Finals.”

The pair competed against rowers from all over the U.S. during the summer to qualify for the world championships

Lindsay began rowing in the sixth grade, and has won many gold medals in local and regional competitions. She is a four-time state champion and has won silver and bronze medals in the quadruple sculls at USRowing Youth Nationals.

Additionally, she has won nationwide regattas for her home team Pelham Community Rowing Association in New Rochelle.

“But there’s no doubt about it. This was simply the greatest way to end one part of the journey before beginning the next,” said Lindsay, who is now a freshman at Yale University, along with her rowing mate, Galloway. 

While the pair has different personalities off the water, on the water they are well matched.

“We just agreed on virtually everything; what the piece was like, what the row was like, what we needed to do, what we needed to do better,” Lindsay said, adding they bring out the best in one another.

The bronze medal winners had trained plenty in windy conditions, which came in handy when a “fierce head-wind” forced changes to lane assignments to accommodate wind patterns.

“Ultimately, it wasn’t different from any other race in terms of just getting it done,” she said. “But it was the longest race of my life and the hardest one. But I think we did a good job getting through it.”

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