Chemistry Professor, Science Majors From College Of New Rochelle Study Lake

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Ivar Hyden, New Rochelle Councilmember District 4, Amy Jackson, President of Glenwood Lake Association, LeeAnne Daley (CNR ’15), Kamala Brown (CNR ’15), Dr. Elvira Longordo, Associate Professor, and Nina Arron, Dir. of Planning and Sustainability.
Ivar Hyden, New Rochelle Councilmember District 4, Amy Jackson, President of Glenwood Lake Association, LeeAnne Daley (CNR ’15), Kamala Brown (CNR ’15), Dr. Elvira Longordo, Associate Professor, and Nina Arron, Dir. of Planning and Sustainability.
Seniors Kamala Brown and LeeAnne Daley from the School of Arts and Sciences at The College of New Rochelle taking measurements at Glenwood Lake in New Rochelle, NY to determine the health of the lake water.
Seniors Kamala Brown and LeeAnne Daley from the School of Arts and Sciences at The College of New Rochelle taking measurements at Glenwood Lake in New Rochelle, NY to determine the health of the lake water. Photo Credit: Contributed

NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y. --  Following the death of some small aquatic wildlife in New Rochelle's Glenwood Lake, members of the Glenwood Lake Association enlisted the help of Dr. Elvira Longordo, associate professor of chemistry and three science majors from the School of Arts and Sciences at The College of New Rochelle to research the lake's chemical health.

The lake empties into a brook that feeds the Hutchinson River, which ultimately empties into Long Island Sound.

The GLA is supporting the students with lakeside assistance and a $2,000 stipend to conduct research on the lake water's chemistry during the summer. The College of New Rochelle also is supporting this research with a grant.

The lake provides sanctuary to birds of the Atlantic waterway as well as native plants and amphibians and is also a precious natural refuge for residents of southern New Rochelle. Concern about the lake water quality spiked recently when a number of crawfish crawled out of the lake and died on its shore.

“A major contributor to depletion of oxygen could be the overgrowth of surface aquatic plants,” said Longordo. “These plants grow because of the introduction of aquatic plant species that are non-native to this area, as well as due to excessive plant nutrient concentrations in the lake that can come from a variety of sources.”

Senior chemistry major Manuela Patino and senior biology majors/chemistry minors LeeAnne Daley and Kamala Brown have developed a sampling plan with Longordo in which they measure dissolved oxygen, phosphates, nitrates, pH, temperature, alkalinity, salinity, and turbidity in the water. 

“It’s a wonderful opportunity for science majors at CNR to learn how to research a real world problem in a field setting,” said Longordo. “They calibrate the instruments they use, take photos and samples, and make measurements both at the lake and in the lab."
 

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Great to see CNR's "Blue Angels" making the news. Keep up the good work!

Signed,

Husband of a CNR alumna.